Japanese scientists create gel to allow tiny drones to mimic bees, collect pollen - ABC Online

Japanese scientists are investigating whether tiny drones can deliver pollen to flowers, mimicking the role of bees, as the insect faces increasing threats from viruses and pesticides around the world. The drones are capable of flying between lily ...

Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators - EurekAlert (press release)

As bees slip onto the endangered species list in the United States, researchers in Japan are pollinating lilies with insect-sized drones. The undersides of these artificial pollinators are coated with horse hairs and an ionic gel just sticky enough to ...

Scientists develop insect-sized sticky drones to help pollinate crops - BGR India

These drones are coated with horse hair and sticky gel that can pick pollen from one flower and deposit it onto other. By PTI | Published: February 12, 2017 11:30 AM IST. 0 Shares. Facebook share · Twitter share · Share on Google+ · Share on Whatsapp.

Japanese Scientists Create Robotic Bees for Better Pollination - PerfScience

Japanese scientists have created small drones which can help bees in taking over some workload of pollination. The robotic bees are tiny and they are capable of moving from one flower to another quite easily. During the process, they can collect and ...

Bio-drones may join bees in the fields - Pawhuska Journal Capital

This illustration shows a remote-controlled, bio-inspired flying robot that can pollinate flowers, much like a bee. Dr. Eijiro Miyako/AIST/TNS. Friday. Posted Feb 10, 2017 at 6:44 AM Updated Feb 10, 2017 at 7:12 AM. Share. Stories from Headlines Network.

Japanese scientists develop sticky insect-sized drones to help pollinate crops - The Indian Express

Researchers are hopeful that their invention could someday help carry the burden that modern agricultural demand has put on colonies and in turn benefit farmers. AddThis Sharing. 00. SHARES. Share to Facebook FacebookShare to Twitter TwitterShare to ...

Robo-Bees Could Aid Insects with Pollination Duties - Scientific American

Mini drones sporting horsehair coated in a sticky gel could one day take the pressure off beleaguered bee populations by transporting pollen from plant to plant, researchers said. Roughly three-quarters of the world's flowering plants and about 35 ...

Sticky, insect-sized drones could act as pollinators - The Japan Times

MIAMI – Small drones coated with horsehair and a sticky gel could one day help pollinate crops and offset the costly loss of bee populations worldwide, researchers in Japan say. The miniature robots, described in the journal Chem, are a long way from ...

A Possible Bee Replacement: Tiny Drones Covered In Sticky Goop - Modern Farmer

With the mass bee extinction showing no signs of stopping—we lost 44 percent of all bee colonies last year—efforts to save the bees might need some supplementation. Eijiro Miyako, a researcher at Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial ...

The World's First Pollinating Drone Could Help Us Survive the Bee-Pocalypse - ScienceAlert

Researchers have developed a remote-controlled pollinator using a miniature drone equipped with a sticky gel, in what could be a glimpse of the future as more and more bee species become endangered. With extinction pressures on bees and the world's ...

'Drone Bees' Show Pollination Potential As Bee Populations Keep Declining - The Inquisitr

Drone bees may be lending a helping hand in the pollination process, what with actual bee populations still trending downwards. A report from the Los Angeles Times looked at a new breakthrough from a group of Japanese scientists who were able to create ...

Drones are not able to pollinate food crops yet, testing shows - Pulse Headlines

About 30 percent of the world's entire food crops need the help of pollination. Recent reports have shown more than one-third of bee species that perform pollination processes are under serious threat. Some of the crops that are in danger because of ...

These are the tiny drones that could save us if bees go extinct - BGR

As has been well documented in recent years, the population of many species of bees are in serious peril. The Trump administration is dragging its feet in adding some of the hardest-hit bees on the endangered species list, but scientists in Japan are ...

Serious bees-ness: Pollinator drones could replace endangered insects - RT

Japanese scientists are developing pollinator drones that can assume the vital role bees normally play in the planet's ecosystem. Dr Eijiro Miyako, from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, experimented with an ionic ...

Imagine a world reliant on robot bees to roam the fields and meadows - Treehugger

Mother Nature has spent a very long time perfecting the ways in which things work together to ensure their longevity. In mutualistic relationships, different species have adapted to one another to provide services that are mutually beneficial. Think ...

We could get a giant army of drone bees - AOL News

The Christian Science Monitor reports that a third of the world's crops need pollination, and 40 percent of pollinating species face threat of extinction. Some scientists think technology straight out of dystopian science fiction may be able to help us ...

Bee Drones? In Real Life? It's More Likely Than You Think - The Mary Sue

The world's bees are dying at an alarming rate, and with them, our hopes of maintaining any kind of crop diversity in our fruits and vegetables. Seeing as how we're not due for a change in the way we use pesticides (thought to be the primary cause for ...

Can a Drone Do the Work of Honeybees? - EcoWatch

Ten years ago, Japanese chemist Eijiro Miyako was trying to invent a liquid that could work as an electrical conductor. But the sticky gel he created failed, so he shoved it into a cabinet in an uncapped bottle and forgot about it. Recently, during a ...

Tiny Robot Drones Developed To Help Declining Bees Pollinate Plants - IFLScience

No, that is not a flying brillo pad, it's a robot artificial pollinator, duh. Dr Eijiro Miyako. Katy Evans. By Katy Evans · 10/02/2017, 17:48. Researchers in Japan have developed tiny insect-sized drones that can artificially pollinate plants, in a bid ...

These Tiny Drones Could Replace Bees As Natural Pollinators - ValueWalk

According to the US Department of Agriculture, about 90% of flowering plants and 35% of food crops rely on animal pollinators to pollinate them. However, the population of key pollinators such as honeybees has been dwindling for years due to viruses ...