'Feed a cold, starve a fever' ISN'T right after all as boffins find eating more helps both - The Sun

THE age-old advice to feed a cold and starve a fever may be wrong. Medical experts have now found that we should try to eat more in both instances after research last year suggested the advice was correct. This is a common time of year for us to suffer ...

Food poisoning bacteria exerts mind control over mice - Digital Journal

A common food bacterium has been found to alter the brains of mice, exerting a form of mind control over the rodents. The observations could actually lead to a medical innovation to assist cancer patients.

Bacteria's sneaky way to spread by getting you to eat more - New Atlas

You no doubt know that the Salmonella strain of bacteria can cause you to become seriously ill. But new research shows that the stomach-distressing bug has a vested interest in keeping you healthy, and uses a tricky mechanism to do so. In a way, it ...

Why salmonella doesn't want you to poop out - Science News (blog)

Salmonella interferes with losses in appetite because more food means more poop, which means more salmonella. CDC. Email. Email. Email. Print. Print. Print. Twitter. Twitter. Twitter. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Reddit. Reddit. Reddit. Google+. Google+.

New Insight Describes Connection between Salmonella Infection and Appetite Loss - Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

The old “feed a cold, starve a fever” saying has been reexamined countless times, but always from the host's point of view. Isn't it time to ask what the pathogen thinks? That's the question that occurred to a team of Salk Institute scientists. These ...

Bacteria May Be Altering Your Brain To Suppress Your Appetite When You're Sick - IFLScience

Many of our body's responses to food poisoning and infection are there to help us fight them. Becoming lethargic, for example, may save energy that can then be used by the immune system to attack the pathogen. But another of the common responses is a ...

Salmonella encourage appetite to promote spread, Salk Institute study finds - The San Diego Union-Tribune

The study could lead to new ways to increase appetite in sick patients or stop excess eating, said Janelle Ayres, a Salk researcher who led the effort. Published Thursday in the journal Cell, the study can be found at j.mp/infectioneat. The study ...

Feed a cold, starve a fever is bad advice, new study suggests - iNews

The old adage “feed a cold, starve a fever” may seem like sensible advice but research indicates that those suffering from the latter could experience a more speedy recovery if they do not forgo food after all – though it could also increase the ...

Feed A Cold, And Starve A Fever? Why Eating More Could Help You Heal Faster When Sick - Medical Daily

Typically, food is the last thing on your mind when you're sick; nausea, sore throats and a general lack of appetite can make eating uncomfortable. A new study, however, shows that feeding your illness can actually speed up recovery. Researchers at the ...

Why you should NOT feed a cold and starve a fever: Experts warn old-age tactic could make everything WORSE - Daily Mail

It's a familiar feeling - you come down with a stomach bug and don't feel much like eating. But 'starving a fever' by eating fewer calories may actually make it more difficult for your body to fight off sickness. Eating to fight an infection could ...

Feed a cold, starve a fever? Not so fast, according to research - Medical Xpress

A Salk Institute study shows how Salmonella Typhimurium blocks the appetite loss response in hosts to both make the host healthier and promote the bacteria's survival and transmission. Credit: Salk Institute. The last time you had a stomach bug, you ...

Microbe that causes food poisoning exerts a sort of mind control over mice - Science Magazine

When we have food poisoning, the last thing we want to do is eat. But in mice, a microbe that causes this ailment actually increases appetite, a new study reveals. Researchers say they might be able to use the same trick to increase eating in cancer ...