Duck and cover all over again - Salon

At the time of the Cuban missile crisis in October of 1962, I was a sophomore in high school in Leavenworth, Kansas. My father was then a lieutenant colonel in the Infantry serving in South Korea, but he had just finished three years as an instructor ...

Why the USA or NATO might never go to war with North Korea - The Maravi Post

In October 1962, the world experienced what came to be known as the “Cuban Missile Crisis.” After the USA had surprised the world with the shocking nuclear bombing of Japan towards the end of World War Two earlier in 1945, an incidence of nuclear ...

The road to diplomacy on the Korean Peninsula - fox2now.com

The United States and North Korea are increasingly at risk of military conflict — most probably through an accident or miscalculation, but possibly a deliberate decision. Opportunities for diplomacy are narrowing. Leaders from the United States, South ...

How a huge radioactive cloud could spread towards Asia and the US if North Korea carries out a nuclear explosion ... - Daily Mail

A new graphic has emerged showing how a radioactive cloud could spread towards Asia and the US if North Korea carries out a nuclear explosion over the Pacific. The simulation reveals the possible two-week spread of an 'atmospheric burst' that could be ...

Alarming graphic predicts radioactive aftermath of N. Korean nuclear launch - RT

In “response to inquiries,” a graphic has been posted online showing the expected range of a radioactive cloud resulting from a North Korea-launched nuclear bomb over the Pacific Ocean. While quite alarming, it was found too rough by some users.

Cheney Was Right - The Weekly Standard

Since Donald Trump took office, the growth of North Korea's nuclear arsenal and the increasing capability and diversity of its ballistic missile force have made that country the most urgent threat to U.S. national security. Observers as diverse as Mark ...

Former NATO military chief: there's a 10% chance of nuclear war with North Korea - Vox

Retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis spent 37 years in the military, including four years as the supreme allied commander of NATO. Hillary Clinton vetted him as a possible running mate. President-elect Donald Trump considered naming him secretary of state.